Professor David Kennedy

David Kennedy is Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Institute for Global Law and Policy at Harvard Law School where he teaches international law, international economic policy, legal theory, law and development, and European law. He joined the Harvard Law faculty in 1981 and holds a Ph.D. from the Fletcher School at Tufts University and a J.D. from Harvard. He is the author of numerous articles on international law and global governance. His research uses interdisciplinary materials from sociology and social theory, economics, and history to explore issues of global governance, development policy, and the nature of professional expertise. He has been particularly committed to developing new voices from the third world and among women in international affairs.

As a practicing lawyer and consultant, Professor Kennedy has worked on numerous international projects, both commercial and public, including work with PricewaterhouseCoopers with their emerging markets and anti-corruption practice, with the United Nations, the Commission of the European Union, the Qatar Foundation, and with the private firm of Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen, and Hamilton in Brussels, where his work combined European antitrust litigation, government relations advising and general corporate law. A member of the U.S. Council on Foreign Relations, he is past Chair and Member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Advisory Council on Global Governance. In 2011, he was appointed Foreign Advisor to Thailand’s Truth for Reconciliation Commission and now serves as a member of the Asian Peace and Reconciliation Commission.

David Kennedy

At Harvard, he served as Chair of the Graduate Committee and Faculty Director of International Legal Studies. He founded the European Law Research Center at Harvard in 1991 and served continuously as its Faculty Director. He has advised a number of educational institutions on their academic programs and lectured as a Visiting Professor at numerous universities across the world. In 2008-2009, he served as Vice President for International Affairs, University Professor of Law, and David and Marianna Fisher University Professor of International Relations at Brown University.

David Kennedy’s Work

Speeches and Presentations

  • Book Talk on A World of Struggle: How Power, Law, and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy as a part of Doctoral Week Sciences Po, Paris, France, June 19, 2017
  • Conference Remarks, Legal World Making as Distribution: The Distributional Impact of Context Making by Legal Expertise, at ITEPE Conference The Law of Political Economy: Transformations in the Functions of Law, Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 15-16, 2017
  • Comments, The law politics and practice of new experimentalism: complexity and pragmatism in action hosted by the Department of Law, London School of Economics and the Overseas Development Institute, London, United Kingdom, May 22-23, 2017
  • Book Talk on A World of Struggle: How Power, Law, and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy PwC, Washington D.C., May 16, 2017
  • The Context for Context: International Legal History in Struggle, Harvard Law School Faculty Workshop, April 6, 2017
  • Response at the Symposium on the Tanner Lecture by Radhika Coomaraswamy, University of Michigan Law School , March 30, 2017
  • Comments at the IGLP Initiative on the Future of Political Economy at SOAS University of London, London, United Kingdom, March 4, 2017
  • Modern War and Modern Law, a lecture on Evolution of International Law and Ethics in Modern Warfare in the Study Period entitled The Global Security Environment NATO College, Rome, March 2, 2017
  • Comments EISA Roundtable: Normativities in International Relations, International Studies Association, Baltimore, Maryland, February 24, 2017
  • Comments Roundtable on The Power of Legality: Practice of International Law and their Politics International Studies Association, Baltimore, Maryland, February 24, 2017
  • Comments, Roundtable on A World of Struggle: How Power, Law, and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy, ISA Convention, Baltimore, Maryland, February 23, 2017
  • Remarks, IGLP Asian Regional Workshop, Bangkok, Thailand, January 5-11, 2017
  • The Rule of Law: A Terrain of Choices, at the Thailand Institute of Justice Forum on the Rule of Law and Sustainable Development, Bangkok, Thailand, January 11, 2017
  • The Trump Election Decoded at the Forum on the Trump Election, Real Colegio Complutense, Madrid, Spain, December 19, 2016
  • Remarks on the panel What Should Democracies Know Kennedy School of Government, December 8 2016
  • Remarks, Asian Peace and Reconciliation Council, annual meeting, Vientiane, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, December 1, 2016
  • Remarks, The Critical Human Rights Theory Workshop discussion of A World of Struggle: How Power, Law, and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy Columbia University, September 29, 2016
  • Comments, Human Rights Theory and Practice Workshop, University of Michigan, October 8, 2016
  • “How Law and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy, Institute for Global Law and Policy, Madrid, Spain, July 20, 2016
  • How Law and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy,” Institute for Global Law and Policy, Madrid, Spain, July 20, 2016
  • Remarks, IGLP Workshop, Madrid Spain, July 18-22, 2016
  • Navigating Issues of Global Law and Policy,” professional education course, Centro de Estudios Garrigues, Madrid Spain, July 12-13, 2016
  • Opening remarks, IGLP Colloquium, Harvard Law School, June 5, 2016
  • The Contemporary Politics of Unease,” presentation and press conference, Vienna, Austria, May 27, 2016
  • Law & Politics in the Debate on UN Security Council Reform panel, UN Security Council Meeting, Ascona, Switzerland, May 23, 2016
  • Remarks introducing A World of Struggle: How Power, Law & Expertise Shape Global Political Economy, by David Kennedy,Institute of Law & Finance, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany, May 18, 2016
  • The Context for Context: International Legal History in Struggle at the conference History, Politics, Law: Thinking through the International, Clare College Conference on History, Politics & Law, Cambridge, UK, May 16, 2016
  • Neutral Processes and Production of Inequality, Annual Conference on Inequality & Human Rights, University Texas at Austin, Texas, April 9, 2016
  • Democracy, Expertise, and Public Opinion, March 31, 2016, New York University Max Weber Conference on Democracy & Expertise, New York, NY
  • Modern War and Modern Law at the panel on The Evolution of International Law & Ethics in Warfare, NATO Defense College, Rome, Italy, March 11, 2016
  • Opening Remarks, IGLP Regional Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, January 11-23, 2016
  • Remarks introducing A World of Struggle: How Power, Law and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy, SOAS, Khalili Lecture Theater, London, for the London Review of International Law, January 14, 2016
  • Remarks at the meeting of the Asian Peace and Reconciliation Council, annual meeting, Beijing, China, December 1, 2015
  • Law & Distributive Struggle in a Global Political Economy, Keynote Lecture, University College London Symposium, London, UK, November 12, 2015
  • Heterodox Law and Heterodox Economics: An Alliance, remarks for the celebration of Joseph Stiglitzs 50 years of teaching, Columbia University, October 17, 2015
  • The Powers of Knowledge: Law, Distribution and Inequality in Global Political Economy, Los Andes University, Bogota, Colombia, August 20, 2015
  • Opening remarks: What is New Thinking in Transnational Law?, at the IGLP Regional Workshop, Los Andes University Law Faculty, Bogota, Colombia, August 20, 2015
  • American Legal Thought, course lectures at the University of Freiburg law faculty, July 2-4, 2015
  • Transnational Regulation in The American Legal Tradition, course presentation at the Centro de Estudios Garrigues, Madrid, Spain, June 30-July 1, 2015
  • Law and Global Political Economy Faculty of Law, Oslo, Norway, June 11, 2015
  • Opening Remarks: What is the IGLP?, June Conference, June 1, 2015
  • What is Expertise? Harvard IGLP conference panel presentation, June 1, 2015
  • The Law and Development Field: The Current Situation at the conference Critical Perspectives in Development and Global Economic Governance, London School of Economics, May 22, 2015
  • Regulating Warfare in the Age of Lawfare,” at the conference, Rape and War: Critical Interdisciplinary Perspectives,” The Pembroke Center, Brown University, May 7, 2015
  • Chair, Next Generation of Threats Symposium, PricewaterhouseCoopers, New York, April 8, 2015
  • Remarks, “Thomas Piketty, Capital in the 21st Century,” Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA, March 6, 2015.
  • Remarks, Yale Human Rights Workshop, New Haven, CT, February 12, 2015.
  • Opening Plenary, Hamad bin Khalifa University, Doha, Qatar, January 3, 2015.
  • Presentation,“Reflections on Global Legal Education, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan, December 16, 2014.
  • Remarks,“Next Left: A Progressive Answer to the Global Social Question, Fundacion Democracia y Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile, November 20, 2014.
  • Presentation,“Law and Global Political Economy, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, December 10, 2014.
  • Remarks, “Law, Development & Poverty” Workshop, University of Cape Town, South Africa, September 11, 2014.
  • Presentation, “Governing Publics and Politics, STS Summer School: Science and Governance at the Frontiers of Life, Cambridge, MA, July 31, 2014.
  • Remarks, “Governance and Globalization: International and European Answers” Conference, Cambridge, United Kingdom, July 4-5, 2014.
  • “The American Approach to Global Law and Policy,” and “Managing Regulartory Risk: Compliance in a World of Conflicting Regulation,” North American Lawyers Program, Centro de Estudios Garrigues, Madrid, Spain, July 1-2, 2014.
  • Conference Convener, “Global Legal Thought: The Legacies of Heterdoxy,” Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA, June 3, 2014.
  • “Globalization and Legal Education,” Law and Boundaries Annual International Conference, Sciences Po, Paris, France, May 19 & 20, 2014.
  • “Critique and Speculation,” “Heterodox Innovations and Development Pathways: Mapping, Method, and Critique” Workshop [IGLP ProSeminar], Sciences Po, Paris, France, May 18, 2014.
  • “Law and Global Political Economy,” Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy, SUNY Buffalo Law School, Buffalo, NY, March 28, 2014.
  • “Global Governance and Political Economy, Cornell Law School, Ithaca, NY, March 26, 2014.
  • “Global Governance and Political Economy Workshop, Tulane University School of Law, New Orleans, LA, February 26, 2014.
  • The Global Context for Risk Management,” 7th Annual PwC Global Economic Crime Survey Roundtable, New York, NY, February 19, 2014.
  • “Heterodoxy in International Law & Policy,” 2014 IGLP Workshop, Hamad bin Khalifa University, Doha, Qatar, January 3, 2014.
  • Rule of Law and Economic Development after 2015: The Importance of Choices,” Investing in the Rule of Law, Justice and Security for the Post 2015 Development Agenda, Thailand Institute of Justice, Bangkok, Thailand, November 15-16, 2013.
  • Fostering Peace and Development,” Dialogue on Diversity, Peace and Diplomacy, Institute of Strategic and International Studies (ISIS), Putrajaya, Malaysia, November 11, 2013.
  • Opening Remarks/Keynote speaker, LANDS Conference, FGV Law School, So Paulo, Brazil, July 1-4, 2013.
  • International Law and Global Political Economy, on the panel on “Power, Privilege and the Pursuit of Justice: Legal Challenges in Precarious Times,” 2013 Annual Meeting of the Law and Society Association, Boston, MA, June 1, 2013.
  • Opening remarks, Formulating a Global Agenda, Next Left: Framing a New Narrative,” FEPS Conference, IDEC-Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain, May 9-11, 2013.
  • Remarks, ARPC Council Meeting, Beijing, China, April 23-25, 2013.
  • Speaker, American Conference Institute’s 29th National Forum on the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, PricewaterhouseCoopers, New York, NY, April 16-17, 2013.
  • Moderator, Koskenniemi Workshop: Does International Law Needs a ‘Progressive’ Idea of History? Temple University, Philadelphia PA, April 12-13, 2013.
  • Keynote Panel, Reducing Poverty and Inequality: Persistent Challenges and New Solutions, The Lauder Institute and the Wharton School, Philadelphia, PA, April 11-12, 2013.
  • Interview, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Washington DC, March 28, 2013.
  • “Critical Approaches to International Law and Warfare”, The American University in Cairo, Egypt, March 10, 2013.
  • Global Governance for the Political Economy of Today, Rafael del Pino Foundation, Madrid, Spain, February 21, 2013.
  • Risk Management and Corporate Anti-Corruption Compliance Strategies — A Discussion with Dr. David Kennedy, American Bar Association, Washington, D.C., February 14, 2013.
  • Critical Legal Scholarship, Birkbeck Law School, London, January 24, 2013.
  • Law and Global Political Economy”, IGLP Workshop, Doha, Qatar, January 11, 2013.
  • American Legal Thought”, lectures presented at the Garrigues law firm, Barcelona and Madrid, September 20-21, 2012.
  • Remarks, at Asian Peace and Reconciliation Council Preparatory Meeting, Bangkok, September 4, 2012.
  • Remarks, at “Development Strategies in the Emerging Markets of the ASEAN Region”, IGLP-Visa Roundtable, Bangkok, August 30-31, 2012.
  • The American Approach to Global Law and Policy and International Economic Regulation, lectures in the International Business Law Program, presented at Garrigues law firm, Madrid, July 3-5, 2012.
  • Development Policy, Global Governance & the New Development State, presented at the conference Global Governance: Critical Legal Perspectives” Liber Amicorum David M. Trubek, at European University Institute, Florence, June 28, 2012.
  • Opening RemarksInstitute for Global Law and Policy Workshop, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, June 5-8, 2012.
  • Remarks, at Private International Law as Global Governance Meeting, Sciences Po, Paris, May 10-11, 2012.
  • Remarks, at the Doctoral Research Workshop, Kings College, London, April 24, 2012.
  • Political Economy & Center-Periphery Dynamics in International Law, at The International Graduate Legal Research Conference (IGLRC), Kings College, London, April 19-24, 2012.
  • Remarks, at The European Legal Project: New ApproachesInstitute for Global Law and Policy, April 12-13, 2012.
  • Remarks, at Policy Workshop: Global Liquidity and Capital as Legal Institutions Institute for Global Law and Policy, March 30, 2012.
  • Remarks, Law, Between Theory and Critique”, Sciences Po, Paris, March 22-23, 2012.
  • Remarks, Humanitarianism and Human Rights: Borders, Connections, Conflicts, NYU Conference on Human Rights, Remarque Institute, New York, March 9, 2012.
  • On Property Rights and Development, at Property Rights and the Human Rights Agenda, University of Texas School of Law, Austin, Texas, March 2, 2012.
  • Keynote Address PodcastInternational Law and the Periphery Conference, Cairo, Egypt, February 19, 2012.
  • Panel Discussion at the Contemporary International Law Workshop at the Ph.D. Seminar at The University of Cambridge Lauterpacht Center for International Law on January 18, 2012.
  • Panel Remarks at the Welsh Center for International Affairs, presented at the Temple of Peace in Cardiff on January 16, 2012.
  • Remarks on Emerging Market Investment at PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLC conference in Boston on December 14, 2011.
  • Panel Remarks at the Launching of the Design Exchange Chair’s Forum – Occupied Economies, presented at the Design Center in Toronto on November 18, 2011.
  • Global Governance and Political Economy, presented as part of the Gallatin Human Rights Initiative and the Gallatin Distinguished Faculty Lecture Series, New University, New York, NY, November 10, 2011.
  • Panel Remarks on Humanitarian Space: Less Geography than Strategy and Humanitarian Compromise: A Debate, presented at the 13th annual Humanitarian Congress: Theory and Praxis of Humanitarian Assistance, Berlin Germany, October 27-28, 2011.
  • Opening Remarks for “Insights on the Future of Libya”, panel presented at the World Economic Forum Special Meeting on Economic Growth and Job Creation in the Arab World, Dead Sea, Jordan, October 23, 2011.
  • Panel Remarks Development Strategies for Economies in Transition at the session on “The Economics of Transition” presented at the World Economic Forum Special Meeting on Economic Growth and Job Creation in the Arab World, Dead Sea, October 23, 2011.
  • American Legal Thought: A Historical Survey, lectures presented at the Garrigues law firm in Barcelona and Madrid, September 22-23, 2011.
  • Busting Bribery: Sustaining the Global Momentum of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, remarks on a reported prepared for the Open Society Institute, Congressional Briefing, Washington DC, September 15, 2011.
  • The Rise of Asia.Or of Political Economy? presented at the conference Asia in the Next Decade, hosted by the Saranrom Institute of Foreign Affairs Foundation and Chulalongkorn University, August 24, 2011.
  • Risk Management: Lessons from Crisis, presented at the PwC Global Seminar Towards a Future for Japan in Tokyo, Japan, July 25, 2011.
  • The American Approach to Global Law and Policy, presented at the Centro de Estudios Garrigues International Business Law Program, Madrid, Spain, July, 12, 2011.
  • Managing International Currency Risk in the Euro Zone, presented at a World Economic Forum at the Center for European Policy, Brussels, Belgium, on June 30, 2011.
  • Expertise as Governance, presented at the Institute for Global Law and Policy Workshop, June 2, 2011.
  • “Some Caution About Property Rights as a Recipe for Economic Development”, presented at the World Bank, Washington D.C., May 26, 2011.
  • Panel Remarks on Anti Corruption Efforts and the UN Convention Against Corruption, presented at the International Workshop on the Development of Academic Anti-Corruption, Northeastern University on May 23, 2011.
  • Panel Remarks on Indigenous Rights and International Law, presented at the University of Texas School of Law, May 6, 2011.
  • Global Governance and Economic Development, presented at World Economic Forum Tackling Global Challenges through International Law, held at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy on April 29, 2011.
  • Global Governance and Regulatory Processes, presented at the Pricewaterhouse Coopers lunch lecture series, Boston, Massachusetts, April 29,2011.
  • Global Governance: Where is Global Public Policy to be Found?, presented at the University of Colorado Law School, April 15, 2011.
  • Global Risk Management, presented at the World Economic Forums Global Risks Meeting, New York, NY, April 7, 2011.
  • Global Regulation and Governance; What Harvard Law School is doing in the Area, presented at the Harvard Law School Association of Germany, Frankfurt, Germany, March 26, 2011.
  • Foundations of American Legal Thought, presented at Sciences Po Law School, Paris France, February 4-5, 2011.
  • Panel Remarks on Confidentiality or Transparency: The Wikileaks Dilemma, at the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland, January 26, 2011.
  • Panel Discussion on Question Time International program, Moderated by BBC presenter Zeinab Badawi, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, January 11, 2011.
  • “Global Governance for the Political Economy of Today” presented at the World Economic Forum’s Summit on the Global Agenda, Dubai, United Arab Emeriates, November 29, 2010. Professor Kennedy also presented this work at:
  • The Institute for Public Planning’s Global Policy Forum The Modern State: Standards of Democracy and Criteria of Efficiency Yaroslavl, Russian Federation, September 10, 2010.
  • The University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza Spain, December 9, 2010.
  • Panel Discussion at the World Economic Forum on Design and Global Challenges, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, October 14, 2010.
  • Remarks at the Kurdistan Region Trade and Investment Conference, London, United Kingdom, June 16, 2010.
  • Participation at the World Economic Forum Global Redesign Summit, Doha, Qatar, May 30-31, 2010.

Delivered commentaries in the following sessions:

  • Redesign Principles: Security Architecture
  • How to Use New Technology and Social Media to Improve Governance
  • Rebuild In Depth: Legitimacy and International Institutions

Directed the session:

  • Rebuild In Depth: Legal Regulatory Environment
  • Participation at the “The Future of European Legal Culture,” in the Univeristy of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland, May 12, 2010.
  • Introductory remarks on panel “Social Rights as Human Rights.”
  • Roundtable on Interdisciplinary Research on International Justice, presented at the University of Michigan Law School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, April 9, 2010.
  • Interview“Of War and Law” with Dr. Catriona Drew (International Law Lecturer at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London), January 26th, 2010.
  • Remarks, presented at the Evaluating Critical Approaches to International Law Workshop at the Universite Paris I, Paris, France, December 11-12, 2009.
  • Remarks, presented at the World Economic Forum Summit on the Global Agenda, Dubai, United Arab Emierates, November 20-22, 2009.
  • Remarks, presented at the Task Force on New Regulatory Models After the Crisis, University of Peking, Beijing, China, October 29-30, 2009.
  • “Modern War and Modern Law” presented at the Suffolk Transnational Law Review Distinguished Speaker Series, Suffolk Law School, Boston, MA, October, 14, 2009. Click HERE to listen to this speech.
  • Remarks, at the UCL Jurisprudence Review Launch, presented at the University College of London, London, England, October 9, 2009.
  • The “Rule of Law,” Political Choices, and Development Common Sense, presented at the Legal Theory Workshop at Yale Law School, New Haven, CT, October 1, 2009.
  • Global Governance Today, a lecture series presented at the Garrigues law firm in Madrid and Barcelona, Spain, September, 2009.
  • Remarks, presented at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting of the New Champions, Dalian, China, September 10-12, 2009.
  • Opening Statement: The Rule of Law at the International Level presented at United Nations, New York, NY, June 15, 2009.
  • Remarks, presented at the conference, Human Rights at UT: A Diaogue at the Intersection of Academics and Advocacy, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, March 26, 2009.
  • After Human Rights: International Humanism after the Fall of Innocents, presented at the Minerva Biennial Conference on Human Righs in Israel, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, December 9, 2008.
  • The Mystery of Global Governance, presented at the World Economic Forum’s Summit on the Global Agenda, Dubai, United Arab Emeriates, November 8, 2008.
  • Remarks, presented at the Conference on Legal Arguments in Debates on War and Peace, The Danish Institute for Military Studies, Copenhagen, Denmark, November 6, 2008.
  • Remarks, presented at the World Public Forum’s Dialogue of Civilizations Meeting, Rhodes, Greece, October 10, 2008.
  • The History of American Legal Thought, a lecture series presented at the Garrigues law firm in Madrid and Alicante, Spain, September, 2008.
  • Concluding Remarks presented at the New perspectives on Law and Development Conference, Universidad de Los Andes, Bogot D.C, Colombia, August 22, 2008.
  • American Legal Thought, a lecture course presented at the University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany, June 27-29, 2008.
  • Legal and Economic Ideas About Development, presented at the University of Manchester, Manchester, England, June 24, 2008.
  • Roundtable on Recent Developments in International Legal Theory, presented at the Australia National University, Canberra, Australia, June 2, 2008.
  • Workshop for senior command officers of the Australian Defense Forces on the use of law in military operations, Canberra, Australia, June 3, 2008.
  • Remarks presented at the Melbourne University seminar and roundtable on the Role of Law in Military Decision Making, Melbourne, Australia, May 27, 2008.
  • Of War and Law, presented at the International Legal Theory Colloquium, Georgetown Law, Washington, D.C., February 1, 2008. This work was also the subject of a roundtable workshop at the School of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ, May 21, 2008.
  • Law and Economic Development: Toward a New Alliance, presented at the International Inequality Conference, Watson Institute for International Studies, Brown University, Providence, RI, April 4, 2008.
  • The Mystery of Global Governance presented at the Sawyer Seminar, University of Minnesota Law School, February 28, 2008.

Professor Kennedy also presented this work at:

    • The Kormendy Lecture, Ohio Northern University, Pettit College of Law, Ada OH, January 25, 2008.
  • Ruling the World: Constitutionalism, International Law and Global Governance (workshop), Temple University School of Law, Philadelphia, PA, December 8-9, 2007.
  • Remarks, China Task Force Meeting , Manchester Business School, Manchester, England, July 4, 2007.
  • Law and Development Projects in Brazil and Beyond, Harvard Law School Alumni Association, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 31, 2007.
  • Remarks, Law and Development in Brazil Conference , Faculdade de Direito da USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil, May 30, 2007.
  • Keynote Address, at The TWAIL Conference, Albany Law School, Albany, New York, April 20, 2007.
  • Remarks at the American Society of International Law Conference “The Future of International Law,” Washington, DC, March 31, 2007.
  • Remarks, \New International Law Conference, Oslo, Norway, March, 2007.
  • Interview“Of War and Law” on BBC Television’s The World, London, England, December 12, 2006.
  • “Modern War and Modern Law” presented at the Center for International and Comparative Law, Baltimore Law School, Baltimore, MD, October, 26, 2006.

Professor Kennedy also presented this work at:

  • University of Minnesota Law School – Minneapolis, MN Novemember 10, 2006.
  • The Institute for Policy Research – London, UK, October 24, 2006.
  • The Fletcher School – Tufts University, Medford, MA, October 18, 2006.
  • The Watson Institute for International Studies ‘Beyond Terror’ Lecture Series, The Watson Institute, Brown University, Providence, RI, October 12, 2006.
  • Interview“Of War and Law” on the BBC’s Radio 4 Today Programme, London, England, October 20, 2006.
  • Book Discussion on “Of War and Law” presented at The Cambridge Forum, Cambridge, MA, September 28, 2006.
  • Remarks,”International Law After the Age of Three Worlds” Conference, Washington, DC, September 15, 2006.
  • Remarks, Initiative for Policy Dialogue’s China Task Force Meeting, Manchester, England, August 8 – 9, 2006.
  • Remarks, Initiative for Policy Dialogue’s Financial Markets Reform Task Meeting, Manchester, England, July 25 – 27, 2006.
  • Remarks, “Law and Development Today” Conference, American University of Cairo, Egypt, May 27, 2006.
  • Remarks, “International Law: Do we Need It?,” European Society of International Law Conference, Paris, France, May 20, 2006.
  • Remarks, “The Role of the International Law Scholarship in Eastern and Central Eastern Europe: From the Past to the Present and the Future” International Symposium, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia, April 29, 2006.
  • Interview, “The Roundtable,” WAMC Northeast Public Radio, April 12, 2006.
  • Remarks, Envisioning a More Democratic Global System symposium, Widener Law School, Wilmington, DE, April 7, 2006.
  • Book Discussion, “The Dark Sides of Virtue,” American Society of International Law Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, March 30, 2006.
  • “Two Sides of the Coin: Human Rights Pragmatism and Idolatry, The Interdisciplinary Conference on Human Rights, Clement House, London School of Economics, London, United Kingdom, March 24, 2006.

Professor Kennedy also presented this work at:

Professor Kennedy also presented this work at:

  • The Legal Theory Workshop, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, February 17, 2006.
  • The ELRC Conference “Teaching From the Left”, Cambridge, MA, March 12, 2006.
  • The “Universalism in International Law and Political Philosophy: An International Colloquium,” Helsinki, Finland, August 3, 2006.
  • Remarks, Rebel Lawyering Conference, Yale Law School, New Haven, CT, February 25, 2006.
  • The Secretary General as Policy Maker, United Nations Secretary General Conference, NYU, New York, NY, February 24, 2006.
  • Panel Discussion“Law and the Politics of Warfare”, “Detainees in the Global War on Terror: Guantanamo Bay and Beyond,” United States Coast Guard Academy, New London, CT, February 1, 2006.
  • Remarks, Library of the Congress of Chile and The European Law Research Center’s Comparative Law Workshop, Santiago, Chile, January 26, 2006.
  • Remarks, Sovereignty in the 21st Century Conference, Columbia University, New York, NY, December 2, 2005.
  • Remarks, “Representing Culture: Translating Human Rights” Symposium, University of Texas School of Law, Austin, TX, November 4, 2005.
  • Remarks, Conference on Human Rights and the Humanities, City University of New York, New York, NY, October 21, 2005.
  • “Modern War and Modern Law”, Brooklyn Law School, Brooklyn, NY, September 23, 2005.
  • “Law as a Strategic Partner in Warfare”, Joint Force Maritime Component Commander Flag Course 05-1, US Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island, August 26, 2005.
  • Remarks, a Harvard Club of Switzerland, Zurich, Switzerland, July 1, 2005.
  • “Reassessing The Humanitarian Promise of the International Legal Tradition”, SAFA, Zurich, Switzerland, June 30, 2005.

Professor Kennedy also presented this work at:

  • Northeastern Law School’s Faculty Colloquium, Boston, MA, April 21, 2005.
  • Yale Law School, New Haven, CT April 22, 2005.
  • The International Conference on Human Rights and Development, Hong Kong, China, May 9, 2005.
  • American University in Cairo, Cairo, Egypt, May, 2005.
  • Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts, November 17, 2005.
  • Interview“The Dark Sides of Virtue”, Radio West, July 29, 2005. Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4
  • “War and International Law: Distinguishing Military and Humanitarian Professions”, United States Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island, June 22, 2005.
  • Remarks on International Legal Scholarship,Student-Faculty Dinner on “Law & Globalization: New Directions for Legal Scholarship,” Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, April 20, 2005.
  • Remarks, Comparative Visions of Global Public Order Symposium Dinner (Honoring Professors Henry Steiner and Detlev Vagts), Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA, March 5, 2005.
  • Remarks, “New Governance Workshop,” Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA, February 25, 2005.
  • “Thinking Like A Lawyer: Legal Education and Legal Thought in the United States” , Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain, December 17, 2004.
  • Remarks, British Institute of International Comparative Law, London, England, December 15, 2004.
  • “Political Choices and Development Common Sense”, Power Law and Global Transformation workshop, University of Wisconsin, November 15, 2004.
  • “The Dark Sides of Humanitarianism: Reassessing International Humanitarianism”, Jonas Bruun Law Firm, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 22, 2004.
  • The Politics of Comparative Law, , Conference on Comparative Methodologies, Paris, France, July 12, 2004.
  • International Law and the Politics of Expertise, “New Perspectives on the Divide Between International Law and National Law,” Conference, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, July 9, 2004.
  • The Dark Sides of Virtue”, Council on Foreign Relations, New York, NY, June 30, 2004.
  • “Challenging Expert Rule: The Politics of Global Governance”, The Julius Stone Address, University of Sydney Law School, June 17, 2004.

Professor Kennedy also presented this work at:

  • The Symposium on Legal Perspectives in a Global Business Environment, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden, August 19, 2004.
  • The Challenging Global Governance Conference, Monterrey, Mexico, November 6, 2004.
  • “International Law and Transnational Regulation,” University of Wisconsin-Harvard Law School Workshop, Madison, Wisconsin, November 13, 2004.
  • The Universit Paris 1 Panthon Sorbonne, January 29, 2005.
  • “Humanitarians in the Cockpit”, Faculty Roundtable, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, June, 16, 2004.
  • Humanitarians in War”, International Law and its Others, University of Melbourne Legal Theory Workshop, Melbourne, Australia, June 9, 2004. Forthcoming in International Law and its Others (edited by Anne Orford, Cambridge University Press).
  • “Reassessing International Humanitarianism: The Dark Sides”, The Allen Hope Southey Memorial Lecture, University of Melbourne Law School, June 8, 2004.

Professor Kennedy also presented this work at:

  • The University College London, London, England, May 27, 2004.
  • The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Medford, Massachusetts, October 21, 2004.
  • Boston University School of Law, Boston, Massachusetts, October 26, 2004.
  • “Challenging Global Governance” Conference, Monterrey, Mexico, November 6, 2004.
  • Universidad Cardenal Herrera, Madrid, Spain, December 20, 2004.
  • The Universit Paris 1 Panthon Sorbonne, January 22, 2005.
  • Chairperson, “Thinking Another World: this cannot be how the world was meant to be” Conference, Lauterpacht Research Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge, May 21, 2004.
  • The Dark Sides of International Adjudication”, University College London, London, England, May 26, 2004.
  • Humanitarians in the Cockpit”, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, May 25, 2004.
  • Reassessing International Humanitarianism” Workshop, HLS Association of Europe Ascension Weekend, Amboise, France, May 21-22, 2004.
  • “International Humanitarian Law”, European Society of International Law Conference, Villa Law Pietra, Florence, Italy, May 15, 2004.
  • Opening Keynote, “Imperialism and International Law” Birkbeck Law School and the Foundation for New Research in International Law Joint Workshop, Birkbeck Law School, London, May 9, 2004.
  • “Humanitarians in the Cockpit: War and the Vocabulary of International Law”, World Legal Orders Conference, Toronto, April 23, 2004.
  • “Memories of Law and Development”, “Practice of Law & Development: Socio-Legal Approaches” conference, Cornell University, April 19, 2004.
  • “The Role of Law & Institutions in Development”, “Globilization, Law & Development Conference” panel, University of Michigan Law School, April 17, 2004.
  • “The Dark Sides of Virtue: Reassessing International Humanitarianism”, Politics and International Law Colloquium Series, UCLA, April 8, 2004.
  • “Law and Human Rights”, Harvard University, March 17, 2004.
  • Closing Remarks, at “Speaking Law to Power: International Law and Foreign Policy”, Wisconsin International Law Journal Symposium, University of Wisconsin Law School, March 6, 2004.
  • “The WTO and the Governance of International Trade”, panel at the Federalist Society Symposium on Law and Public Policy, Vanderbilt University Law School, February 22, 2004.
  • “The Politics of Expertise”, Northeastern University Law School, November 2003.
  • “Laws and Developments”, Workshop on Globalization and Development, IMEMO Institute of World Economy and International Relations, Moscow, October 29-30, 2003.
  • “International Legal Consciousness”, IIP Symposium, Vienna, Austria, October 2003.
  • “Laws and Developments”, “Law and Economic Development: Critiques and Beyond,” Workshop, University of Wisconsin Law School, October 17, 2003.

Curriculum Vitae

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

  • Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, 2003-2007; 2008-3009; since 2011;
  • Director, Institute for Global Law and Policy, Harvard Law School, since 2009;
  • Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, 1986-1994, 2009-10; Assistant Professor, 1983-1986; Lecturer, 1981-1983;
  • Director, European Law Research Center, 1991-2009;
  • Faculty Director, Graduate and International Legal Studies, 1991-1997;
  • Chair, Committee of Graduate Studies, 1990-1997;
  • Henry J. Shattuck Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, 1994-2003;

Courses: International Law, Global Law and Policy, Law and Economic Development, European Union Law, International Economic Law, American Legal Thought

  • Visiting Professor, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, since 2007.
  • Vice President for International Affairs, University Professor of Law and David and Marianna Fisher University Professor of International Relations, Brown University, 2008-2009.
  • Visiting Professor, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, Fall 2006
  • Visiting Professor, New York University Law School, Spring 1999;

Courses: Foreign Relations Law and International Law.

  • Of counsel, Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton, Brussels, Belgium, 1989-1990. General corporate, European Communities and government relations practice.
  • Consultant for various projects involving international and European Community Law, including work for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the European Communities Commission Legal Service, the Monterey Institute of International Studies, Doctors Without Borders, the Thai Foreign Ministry, The Qatar Foundation, and PricewaterhouseCoopers.

EDUCATION:

  • Juris Doctor, Honoris Causa, University of Helsinki, 2010.
  • Ph.D., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, 1984.

Fields: international law and organizations, international economics, law and development.

  • J.D., magna cum laude, Harvard Law School, 1980.
  • M.A.L.D., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, 1979.
  • A.B., with honors, Brown University, 1976.

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP:

  • District of Columbia Bar, admitted 1980
  • Council on Foreign Relations, since 2003
  • Member, Scientific Advisory Board, Sciences Po, Paris, France, since 2008
  • Member and past Chairman, World Economic Forum’s Advisory Council on Global Governance, since 2009
  • Member, Asian Peace and Reconciliation Council, since 2012
  • Member, International Advisory Board, School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, American University in Cairo, since 2013

OVERSEAS EXPERIENCE AND LANGUAGES:

  • Visiting Professor, Sciences Po, 2011;
  • University of Paris X, Nanterre, 1995-96, 1996-97, 1998, 2001-2002, 2005-2006;
  • University of Turin, 2001 and 2002;
  • Visiting Scholar, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, 2000-2001;
  • Visiting Professor, Australian National University, 2000;
  • University of Paris II, 1998;
  • University of Toronto 1998 and 1999;
  • Fulbright Fellow, Belgium 1984;
  • Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung and Sheldon Fellow, Germany;
  • Fellow jointly at Institute for International Law, Kiel University and Institute for International Affairs, Hamburg University, Germany, 1980-1981.

German (reading and speaking);
French (reading and comprehension).

Subject Areas for Supervising Written Work

  • International Law
  • Legal Theory
  • Law and development
  • European Union law

COURSES (2006-2013)

  • Global Law and Governance (Fall 2013)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid commons username and password to access the course website.

    This course explores a range of legal disciplines which purport to explain how we are governed globally and which propose projects for improving global governance through law. We will focus on the field of international law and organization, examining the history of ideas, legal doctrines, institutional and administrative structures developed over the last century to organize and legalize international economic and political life. The readings will focus on various ways to think about the legal organization of global order, and on the history of legal efforts to organize and institutionalize international affairs.

  • Law and Economic Development (Fall 2013)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course will deal with past and present debates over the role of the legal order in economic development. We will explore the relationships among economic ideas, legal ideas and the development policies pursued at the national and international level in successive historical periods. We will focus on the potential for an alliance of heterogenous traditions from economics, law and other disciplines to understand development.

  • Global Law & Expertise, STS (Spring 2013)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    The significance of expertise for rulership today is easy to see – in the vernacular of national politics, the management of international economic life, the arrangement of family and gender relations, and more. But what is “expertise?” What part knowledge, what part common-sense — what portion analytics, argument, lifestyle, character? Expertise is often associated with professional or disciplinary formations – how important are these institutional forms to the practice and reproduction of expert rulership? How does expertise write itself into power?The aim of the seminar will be to develop components of a general model or theory of expertise. We encourage a wide range of interdisciplinary studies which might shed light on the following sorts of questions:

    • How do more and less conscious components of expert knowledge function? Is there a “langue” and a “parole” to expert argument? What are the components of expert knowledge, how do they operate – linguistically, ideologically, practically? How significant are elements like “distinction,” “difference” or “decision?”
    • How do expert analytics relate the looser patois of expert analysis, commentary, opinion? How much is prejudice, group-think – or useful rules of thumb and default judgment?
    • How are expert and lay practices and knowledges intertwined? What can we say about the rise and fall of expert self-confidence or prestige as various “expertises” come in and out of fashion in different domains of life?
    • How do new modes of expertise arise, assert themselves? What of the people whose projects are pursued through expertise – projects of affiliation and disaffiliation, wills to power and to submission?

    With luck, the seminar will bring together scholars approaching these issues from multiple fields of inquiry – historical studies of expert vernaculars and professional practices; cultural study of the languages of governance and the management of the subject; philosophers interested in the operations of language and rhetoric, science studies scholars who look at ways expert knowledge gives power to scientific claims; sociologists of the professions and of contemporary practices of power. We particularly encourage participation by scholars from professional fields inquiring into the modes of their own rulership.

  • Global Law and Governance (Fall 2012)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course explores a range of legal disciplines which purport to explain how we are governed globally and which propose projects for improving global governance through law. We will focus on the field of international law and organization, examining the history of ideas, legal doctrines, institutional and administrative structures developed over the last century to organize and legalize international economic and political life. The readings will focus on various ways to think about the legal organization of global order, and on the history of legal efforts to organize and institutionalize international affairs.

  • Law and Economic Development (Fall 2012)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course will deal with past and present debates over the role of the legal order in economic development. We will explore the relationships among economic ideas, legal ideas and the development policies pursued at the national and international level in successive historical periods. We will focus on the potential for an alliance of heterogenous traditions from economics, law and other disciplines to understand development.

  • Law and Economic Development (Spring 2012)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course will deal with past and present debates over the role of the legal order in economic development. We will explore the relationships among economic ideas, legal ideas and the development policies pursued at the national and international level in successive historical periods. We will focus on the potential for an alliance of heterogenous traditions from economics, law and other disciplines to understand development.

  • The Power and Mystery of Expertise (Spring 2012)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    The significance of expertise for rulership today is easy to see – in the vernacular of national politics, the management of international economic life, the arrangement of family and gender relations, and more. But what is “expertise?” What part knowledge, what part common-sense — what portion analytics, argument, lifestyle, character? Expertise is often associated with professional or disciplinary formations – how important are these institutional forms to the practice and reproduction of expert rulership? How does expertise write itself into power?The aim of the seminar will be to develop components of a general model or theory of expertise. We encourage a wide range of interdisciplinary studies which might shed light on the following sorts of questions:

    • How do more and less conscious components of expert knowledge function? Is there a “langue” and a “parole” to expert argument? What are the components of expert knowledge, how do they operate – linguistically, ideologically, practically? How significant are elements like “distinction,” “difference” or “decision?”
    • How do expert analytics relate the looser patois of expert analysis, commentary, opinion? How much is prejudice, group-think – or useful rules of thumb and default judgment?
    • How are expert and lay practices and knowledges intertwined? What can we say about the rise and fall of expert self-confidence or prestige as various “expertises” come in and out of fashion in different domains of life?
    • How do new modes of expertise arise, assert themselves? What of the people whose projects are pursued through expertise – projects of affiliation and disaffiliation, wills to power and to submission?

    With luck, the seminar will bring together scholars approaching these issues from multiple fields of inquiry – historical studies of expert vernaculars and professional practices; cultural study of the languages of governance and the management of the subject; philosophers interested in the operations of language and rhetoric, science studies scholars who look at ways expert knowledge gives power to scientific claims; sociologists of the professions and of contemporary practices of power. We particularly encourage participation by scholars from professional fields inquiring into the modes of their own rulership.

  • Global Law and Governance (Fall 2011)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course explores a range of legal disciplines which purport to explain how we are governed globally and which propose projects for improving global governance through law. We will focus on the field of international law and organization, examining the history of ideas, legal doctrines, institutional and administrative structures developed over the last century to organize and legalize international economic and political life. The readings will focus on various ways to think about the legal organization of global order, and on the history of legal efforts to organize and institutionalize international affairs.

  • Law and Economic Development (Spring 2011)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course will deal with past and present debates over the role of the legal order in economic development. We will explore the relationships among economic ideas, legal ideas and the development policies pursued at the national and international level in successive historical periods. We will focus on the potential for an alliance of heterogenous traditions from economics, law and other disciplines to understand development.

  • Global Law and Governance (Fall 2010)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course explores a range of legal disciplines which purport to explain how we are governed globally and which propose projects for improving global governance through law. We will focus on the field of international law and organization, examining the history of ideas, legal doctrines, institutional and administrative structures developed over the last century to organize and legalize international economic and political life. The readings will focus on various ways to think about the legal organization of global order, and on the history of legal efforts to organize and institutionalize international affairs.The course takes the discipline of “public international law as a starting point. Across the twentieth century, the discipline consolidated a community of lawyers and jurists with a common vocabulary, a shared sense of history and a shared range of professional activities. They continue to offer accounts of how the world is organized and projects for its reorganization. The casebook presents itself as a “classical” treatment, the distributed materials juxtapose various alternative historical, theoretical and avant-gardist points of views. The start of the twenty-first century has been characterized by a variety of challenges and proposals to rethink and reorient our modes of collective problem solving and policy making at the global level. As a result, we will spend some time thinking about history. What came before twentieth century international law? How was international legal modernism born and built in the first half of the last century? What happened in the half-century after 1945, after 1989, after 2001? What will happen next?Click HERE for the course syllabus.

  • Law and Economic Development (Spring 2011)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course will deal with past and present debates over the role of the legal order in economic development. We will explore the relationships among economic ideas, legal ideas and the development policies pursued at the national and international level in successive historical periods. We will focus on the potential for an alliance of heterogenous traditions from economics, law and other disciplines to understand development.Click HERE for the course syllabus.

  • The Power and Mystery of Expertise (2010-2011)

    (Pembroke Center Postdoctoral Fellowship Seminar)

    The significance of expertise for rulership today is easy to see in the vernacular of national politics, the management of international economic life, the arrangement of family and gender relations, and more. But what is expertise? What part knowledge, what part common-sense — what portion analytics, argument, lifestyle, character? Expertise is often associated with professional or disciplinary formations how important are these institutional forms to the practice and reproduction of expert rulership? How does expertise write itself into power?The aim of the seminar will be to develop components of a general model or theory of expertise. We encourage a wide range of interdisciplinary studies which might shed light on the following sorts of questions:

    • How do more and less conscious components of expert knowledge function? Is there a langue and a parole to expert argument? What are the components of expert knowledge, how do they operate linguistically, ideologically, practically? How significant are elements like distinction, difference or decision?
    • How do expert analytics relate the looser patois of expert analysis, commentary, opinion? How much is prejudice, group-think or useful rules of thumb and default judgment?
    • How are expert and lay practices and knowledges intertwined? What can we say about the rise and fall of expert self-confidence or prestige as various expertises come in and out of fashion in different domains of life?
    • How do new modes of expertise arise, assert themselves? What of the people whose projects are pursued through expertise projects of affiliation and disaffiliation, wills to power and to submission?

    With luck, the seminar will bring together scholars approaching these issues from multiple fields of inquiry � historical studies of expert vernaculars and professional practices; cultural study of the languages of governance and the management of the subject; philosophers interested in the operations of language and rhetoric, science studies scholars who look at ways expert knowledge gives power to scientific claims; sociologists of the professions and of contemporary practices of power. We particularly encourage participation by scholars from professional fields inquiring into the modes of their own rulership.

    Click HERE for the course syllabus.

  • International Law and Global Governance (Winter 2010)

    (Taught at The School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London)This course explores a range of legal disciplines, which purport to explain how we are governed globally. We will focus on the field of international law and organization, examining the history of ideas, legal doctrines, institutional and administrative structures developed over the last century to organize and legalize international economic and political life. We will situate the United Nations system in relationship to the broader institutional structures of public international law and regulation, private ordering and multinational enterprise, non-governmental organization and transnational judicial cooperation. The course will combine intellectual and institutional history with an examination of various constitutional and institutional arrangements. We will examine the functioning of these various international organizational mechanisms in a series of different substantive areas, paying particular attention to human rights, economic law and regulation, development, and the use of force. The assigned readings will focus on various ways to think about the legal organization of global order, and on the history of legal efforts to organize and institutionalize international affairs.Click HERE for the course syllabus.

  • Law and Development (Fall 2009)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course will deal with past and present debates over the role of the legal order in economic development. We will explore the relationships among economic ideas, legal ideas and the development policies pursued at the national and international level in successive historical periods. We will focus on the potential for an alliance of heterogenous traditions from economics, law and other disciplines to understand development. Limited enrollment. J.D. students may enroll only with the instructor’s permission – those wishing to enroll should email a brief statement of their background and intellectual interest in the course to the instructor.Click HERE for the course syllabus.

  • Global Governance Today Reading Group (Fall 2009)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This reading group will explore a variety of recent legal literature which purports to explain how we are governed globally. It is surprising now mysterious global governance remains — and how quickly confidence in both the sociological descriptions of global legal life and projects for renewal offered by the traditional disciplines of public international law, international economic law, international organizations have broken down. What else is on offer? That will guide our exploration of new literatures in fields touching on global regulation, international legal history, global administrative law, new thinking about comparative legal study, global constitutionalism, human rights, or economic law and development. The readings will exemplify various ways to think about the legal organization of global order, and on the history of legal efforts to organize and institutionalize international affairs.Click HERE for the course syllabus.

  • International Law and Global Governance (Winter 2009)

    (Taught at The School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London)This course explores a range of legal disciplines, which purport to explain how we are governed globally. We will focus on the field of international law and organization, examining the history of ideas, legal doctrines, institutional and administrative structures developed over the last century to organize and legalize international economic and political life. We will situate the United Nations system in relationship to the broader institutional structures of public international law and regulation, private ordering and multinational enterprise, non-governmental organization and transnational judicial cooperation. The course will combine intellectual and institutional history with an examination of various constitutional and institutional arrangements. We will examine the functioning of these various international organizational mechanisms in a series of different substantive areas, paying particular attention to human rights, economic law and regulation, development, and the use of force.� The assigned readings will focus on various ways to think about the legal organization of global order, and on the history of legal efforts to organize and institutionalize international affairs.Click HERE for the course syllabus.

  • Law and Development (Fall 2008)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course will deal with past and present debates over the role of the legal order in economic development. After preliminary discussions of economists’ theories of growth and legal theorists’ views of law in society, we will focus on such issues as Third World nationalist regimes’ attempts at regulation and planning, the role of the international trade regime, and the legal structures put in place during current transitions to a market economy through privatization. Limited enrollment. J.D. students may enroll only with the instructor’s permission – those wishing to enroll should email a brief statement of their background and intellectual interest in the course to the instructor.Click HERE for the course syllabus.

  • International Law and Global Orders (Winter 2008)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course explores a range of legal disciplines, which purport to explain how we are governed globally. We will focus on the field of international law and organization, examining the history of ideas, legal doctrines, institutional and administrative structures developed over the last century to organize and legalize international economic and political life. We will situate United Nations system in relationship to the broader institutional structures of public international law and regulation, private ordering and multinational enterprise, non-governmental organization and transnational judicial cooperation. The course will combine intellectual and institutional history with an examination of various constitutional and institutional arrangements. We will examine the functioning of these various international organizational mechanisms in a series of different substantive areas, paying particular attention to human rights, economic law and regulation, development, and the use of force. The assigned readings will focus on various ways to think about the legal organization of global order, and on the history of legal efforts to organize and institutionalize international affairs.Click HERE for the course syllabus.

  • International Law (Fall 2007)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course concerns the theoretical and doctrinal arguments which have structured thinking about international legal issues. It considers basic doctrines of public international law about the sources of law and the international legal process. We consider the use made of these materials in addressing such issues as human rights, environmental policy, terrorism, and war. The course compares the public international legal tradition with the neighboring fields of international institutions, international economic law and comparative law. We will examine both the history of international legal argument and contemporary scholarship, which is innovative and theoretical. We will focus on the various ways of thinking and talking about institution building and international dispute resolution and about the projects, personal and professional, visible in the discipline’s basic doctrinal materials.There is no prerequisite. In the past only about half of the students in the course, including many graduate students, have had some previous exposure to international law.Materials: Damrosch, Henkin, Pugh, Schachter and Smit, International Law Cases and Materials (West 4th ed. 2001) and supplemental materials.

    Click HERE for the course syllabus.

  • American Legal Thought (Fall 2006)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This short course will review a canonical set of materials from the American tradition of legal scholarship from Oliver Wendell Holmes to the present. We will try to see what, if anything, makes the North American way of thinking about law distinctive. Pragmatism? Policy science? Interdisciplinary work? We will look at the foundational texts for the major “schools” of American legal scholarship, including legal realism, legal process, law and economics, law and society, critical legal studies, and feminism. We will explore how the American tradition looks and how it has been received outside the United States, as well as the relations between this peculiar way of thinking about law and the American style of legal practice.This course is designed for students interested in understanding how American jurists think. It has been designed to be particularly helpful for LL.M. students. Rather than an exam, the course will conclude with a very short (five-page maximum) reaction paper to one of the articles we have considered.Materials: “The Canon of American Legal Thought,” David Kennedy and William Fisher, Princeton University Press (2006).

  • Law and Development (Fall 2006)

    NOTE: You will need to be enrolled in this course with a valid icommons username and password to access the course website.

    This course will deal with past and present debates over the role of the legal order in economic development. After preliminary discussions of economists’ theories of growth and legal theorists’ views of law in society, we will focus on such issues as Third World nationalist regimes’ attempts at regulation and planning, the role of the international trade regime, and the legal structures put in place during current transitions to a market economy through privatization. Limited enrollment. J.D. students may enroll only with the instructor’s permission – those wishing to enroll should email a brief statement of their background and intellectual interest in the course to the instructor.Materials: “The Process of Economic Development”, 2nd Edition, James Cypher and James Dietz, eds. (Routledge, 2004) and supplemental materials.

  • International Law and Organization (Fall 2006)

    (Taught at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy)This course provides an introduction to the field of international law and organization, examining the history of ideas, legal doctrines, institutional and administrative structures developed over the last century to organize and legalize international economic and political life. We will examine the United Nations system, situating it in relationship to the broader institutional structures of public international law and regulation, private ordering and multinational enterprise, non-governmental organization and transnational judicial cooperation. The course will combine intellectual and institutional history with an examination of various constitutional and institutional arrangements.We will examine the functioning of these various international organizational mechanisms in a series of different substantive areas, paying particular attention to human rights, economic law and regulation, development, and the use of force. We will approach the organization and institutionalization of global society from the viewpoint of law, rather than political science. The assigned readings will focus on various ways to think about the legal organization of global order, and on the history of legal efforts to organize and institutionalize international affairs.Click HERE for the course syllabus.

  • European Union Law (Winter 2006)

    This course is based on simulation exercises in which students analyze and develop practice skills appropriate for international legal work. Students will play roles in a range of exercises based on real-life practice problems, involving legal work as judges, advocates, lobbyists, bureaucrats and private practitioners. We will examine the work done by attorneys in complex international negotiations and multi-jurisdictional practice. We will build skills for factual development, drafting, oral argument, negotiation, persuasion and on-the-spot analytic thinking in cross-cultural practice settings. Substantively, we will focus on the law of the European Union, and on the relationship between EU rule-making, the US trade negotiation machinery and the WTO framework. Individual simulations raise issues of environmental law, antitrust regulation, company law, intellectual property and other areas of regulation and policy in which the European Union has been active. The course will meet, often in small group preparatory and negotiation settings, for 4 hours each day — from 9:00 AM 1:00 PM.This course will be co-taught by Dr. Jean-Francois Verstrynge, an honorary Director General with the Commission of the European Communities in Brussels.Click HERE for the course syllabus.