IGLP Current Fellows

The IGLP is pleased to welcome the following residential fellows in the 2021-2022 academic year.

2020-2021 Residential Fellows

Debolina Dutta

Debolina Dutta

Dr Debolina Dutta is an assistant professor at Jindal Global Law School, India and a Visiting Fellow at the Institute for International Law and the Humanities, Melbourne Law School, where she also completed her PhD. Debolina’s research is located at the intersections of feminist jurisprudence, postcolonial theory, law and the humanities, sexuality studies, and feminist ethics. As a feminist lawyer, researcher and activist Debolina has had a long-standing relationship with the sex workers’ movement in India. She has worked as a sexual rights advocate both nationally and internationally, including at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva as the advocacy and research officer at CREA, New Delhi. Her writings have appeared in the Australian Feminist Law Journal, Childhood, Feminist Studies, Routledge Handbook on the Politics of Global Health, Palgrave Handbook of Gender and Development, and forthcoming in the Edward Elgar Research Handbook in Law and Literature and the International Journal of Law in Context. She was awarded the Audrey Rapoport Prize for Scholarship on Gender and Human Rights in 2017. Her co-directed documentary film We Are Foot Soldiers, on the collectivization of children of sex workers in Sonagachi, Kolkata, received the 3rd prize at the 2012 Jeevika: Asia Livelihood Documentary Competition

Aliki Semertzi

Aliki Semertzi

Aliki is a PhD candidate at the IHEID Geneva Graduate Institute. Her current research focuses on the thesis of indeterminacy of international law. By drawing from the currents of thought of structuralism, poststructuralism, deconstruction, postcolonial and cultural studies, she traces how the indeterminacy thesis emerged in international legal discourse, how it influenced and changed international legal scholarship, and in particular, what is today the indeterminacy’s potential for its employment for contestation and emancipatory projects – especially in relation to gender and sexuality and queer approaches to international law. In the course of her PhD, Aliki has also served as a Teaching Assistant at the International Law Department of the IHEID, assisting courses and teaching tutorials on theories of international law, transnational regulatory processes, a discourse analysis of international law, and history of international law. She has also worked as a research assistant to the IHEID’s Global Health Program, and to the UN’s International Law Commission (ILC). Prior to that, Aliki worked at the EU’s European Commission, at the Directorate General for Trade, and provided legal research in the course of the EU’s negotiation of Free Trade Agreements (FTAs).

Her research has been published in the Melbourne Journal of International Law and the Common Market Law Review. Aliki holds a Master in International Law from the IHEID Geneva Graduate Institute, an LLM in International and European Law from the Vrije Universiteit of Brussels, and an LLB in Law from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

Love Ronnelid

Love Ronnelid

Love Rönnelid has been an IGLP Residential Fellow since 2018. He is an international lawyer with an interest in how international investment law affects economic development. As a resident fellow at the IGLP he will explore the way standards of treatment under investment law relates to previously successful development strategies. He is broadly interested in international economic law, legal history, philosophy of law, political economy and international relations. He holds a LL.M. and a LL.D. from the Uppsala University, where he has also taught extensively.

Veronica Pecile

Veronica Pecile

Veronica Pecile is an interdisciplinary scholar broadly interested in sociology of law, critical theory, and cultural studies. She obtained her Ph.D. in Law and Social Sciences at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales and was a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society at UC Berkeley. She holds a Master’s Degree in International Affairs from Sciences Po – Paris and a Bachelor’s Degree in International Relations from the University of Trieste.

 

In her research at IGLP, she looks at the counter-hegemonic uses of the law made by the movement for the commons that has emerged in Southern Europe after the 2008 economic crisis. Expanding on her previous doctoral research, she looks at the legal and social institutions that have been put in place by the movement to oppose the neoliberal reorganization of societies and economies. She is particularly interested in investigating how property is being reimagined in non-absolute and non-individualistic terms as a tool to achieve social justice and resource redistribution. She is also exploring the possibility of legally instituting the commons in ways that protect nonhuman interests.

Michele Tedeschini

Michele Tedeschini

Michele Tedeschini obtained his PhD from SOAS University of London (2020), where he carried out a deconstructive analysis of the problems raised by the formation of customary human rights law. Before joining the IGLP, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for Global Cooperation Research at the University of Duisburg-Essen. His current research focuses on the ideological legacy of the New International Economic Order (NIEO), exploring possible connections between the NIEO and the initiatives pursued by the BRICS group. Michele is also interested in psychoanalytic readings of international law, with a particular focus on the administration of international criminal justice.

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