From July 1-4, 2013, The IGLP  Co-Sponsored a seminar on the “Law and New Development Strategies: Brazil and Beyond.” This initiative was hosted and co-sponsored by the Faculty of Law of the University of São Paulo and by the FGV Law School, in Brazil, and by IGLP – Harvard and Wisconsin Law School in the US is conceived and designed to launch LANDS 2.0, the second phase of LANDS, the project on Law and the New Developmental State.
David Trubek, Roberto Pires, Ronaldo Porto Macelo Jr., David Kennedy, Calixto Salomao Filho, John Ohnesorge, Bruno Mayerhof Solama.

Starting in 2007, the LANDS project gathered scholars from various countries with the purpose of exploring the changing roles of state and law in development policies. LANDS generated case studies primarily focused on the Brazilian experience (as well as comparative studies with Colombia and Mexico). They have led to the general conclusion that in response to major setbacks in the transition to a market economy during the 1990s Brazil has been exploring new development policies and experimented with new approaches to governance and regulation. This includes adding new policy goals to the policy agenda, designing new institutional arrangements as well as legal tools, processes and narratives to implement it.

Primarily, the project is focused on the developing world. It aims at discovering varieties of arrangements that reveal different anatomies and that serve different objectives and functionalities as compared to neoclassical mainstream arrangements based on the labels of “good governance”, “getting institutions right” and “one size-fits-all”.

Thus, assuming that there are new and non-canonic experiences taking place in developing world, the second objective of this project is to verify to what extent they could serve as strategic building blocks upon which it is possible to rethink and rebuild global governance in a more democratic and developmental-friendly way. Some of the main questions to be answered in this project are the following:

1. Assuming that there are promising policy alternatives, what are the corresponding legal and political institutional arrangements adopted?

2. Taking into account relevant areas such as macroeconomic governance, industrial policy, social policy, international economic law and corporation, corporate governance and unequal societies, what are the main observable similarities and contrasts among other developing countries such as (but not limited to) China, India, South Africa, Russia, Brazil?

3. To what extent these experiences can provide new insights to rethink the global governance and the current knowledge on law and political economy?

4. To what extent policy research and comparison in this context provide room and opportunity for new methods or research approaches to be designed in the field of law and development?

Participants will examine these questions and more with the aim of identifying new ways of thinking about development, pointing out new policies and highlighting legal innovations. We would like you to present a paper (preferably) and/or participate in as a discussant.

 

Check back soon for the seminar schedule and list of participants.