On November 16th-17th, 2017, together with the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict at Arizona State University, the Program on Science, Technology and Society at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and the Templeton Religion Trust, IGLP co-sponsored a two-days-long workshop reflecting on the status, forms, and social meanings of disenchantment a century after Weber introduced that word into the vocabulary of Western thought. The workshop focused specifically on the status of science and technology in public life. It attended to the relationship between disenchantment, secularization and the cultural authority of scientific knowledge. Science occupies a position of secular authority by virtue of the presumption that science exemplifies secularity. In order to make sense of this political moment, and of the place of science within it, the workshop posed the question: how and in what forms has disenchantment come to inhabit professional identities, or institutional forms and practices, whether as an aspiration, a presumptive attribute, or a regulative ideal—in short, how is disenchantment imagined, understood and enacted?

More information about the workshop and its program can be found here.