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The IGLP is pleased to announce we will be co-sponsoring the 13th Annual Harvard Graduate Student Conference on International History on March 14-15, 2013 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  The 2013 theme is “Law and International History” and the keynote speaker is Lauren Benton. Now on its thirteenth year, the goal of ConIH is to bring together graduate students from around the United States and the world to present their research. The conference aims to interrogate the role of law in international, global, and transnational history, and to think critically about law as a concept and a tool in historical analysis.

Law is often at the heart of international historical inquiry—whether as a subject of study in its own right, a structure providing context for historical analysis, or a source base for amplifying otherwise-unheard voices. This year, ConIH aims to promote a dialogue among historians who use legal sources and ideas in their work. We hope to interrogate the role of law in international, global, and transnational history, and to think critically about law as a concept and a tool in historical analysis.

The conference is structured around a series of panels. Twelve graduate students present their work and then receive individual comments from an established professor in their field, usually drawn from the Harvard community. The following are the selected papers for the conference:

Una Bergamane (Sciences Po), “The non-recognition by the West of the annexation of the Baltic states”
Marco Basile (Harvard), “Lincoln’s Lawyers in Africa”
Reynolds Richter (NYU), “Uncertain Transcripts: Modernizing Customary Law Courts in Coastal Kenya, 1945-1981”
Julia Leikin (University College London), “A Widow’s Plea, or the Reach of Prize Law from the Barracks of Kronstadt to the Houses of Parliament, 1816-1819”
Lydia Walker (Harvard), “l’ONU, c’est quelle tribu?” The United Nations Intervention in the Congo, 1960-1961
Benjamin Brady (Virginia), “Equality Before Efficiency: American Antitrust Law and European Integration”
Chris Miller (Yale), “From Extraterritoriality to Special Economic Zones: Anti-imperialism and foreign investment, 1970-1990”
Melissa Teixeira (Princeton), “Citizenship, Development, and Constitutionalism in the South Atlantic: The connected corporatist experiments of Portugal and Brazil, 1930-1945”
Mark Sweeney (Waterloo), “Beyond the Limits of War Crimes Trials: American, British and Canadian Responses to Jurisdictional Failures in Pacific ‘Minor’ War Crimes Trials”
Nova Robinson (Rutgers), “Arab Women, The League of Nations and the Politicization of Women’s Rights”
William San Martin (UC Davis), “Pettifoggers contesting the state: Judicial misconducts, legal cultures and justice administration in late and post-colonial Colombia and Venezuela.”
Clara Altman (Brandeis), “Damages and Colonial Difference: American Tort Law in Early Twentieth Century Philippine Jurisprudence”

Click HERE for more information